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Smoke & Sunshine: A Craft Barbecue Meat Up
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West Palm Beach, FL – Get ready for a barbecue experience like no other at the 2nd Annual Smoke & Sunshine: A Craft Barbecue Meat Up. This event is not just a feast for the palate but a celebration of the art of barbecue, set to take place on January 20th from 12pm to 3pm at Tropical Smokehouse.

The Event
Smoke & Sunshine offers a unique blend of culinary artistry and community spirit. Organized by Robert Jacob Lerma and Rick Mace of Tropical Smokehouse, the event brings together a stellar lineup of pitmasters. These include Andy Munoz (Moo's Craft Barbecue), Bryan Furman (Bryan Furman BBQ), Carey Bringle (Peg Leg Porker), Charlie McKenna (Lillie’s Q), Hector Garate (Palmira Barbecue), Jeffrey Budnechky (Apocalypse BBQ), John Bates (InterStellar BBQ), Jordan Wright (Wright’s Barbecue), Kerry Bexley (Snow's BBQ), and Raheem Sealey (Drinking Pig BBQ), among others.

Culinary Delights
Attendees can expect an explosion of flavors, as each pitmaster...
Low and Slow vs. Hot and Fast: Perfecting BBQ Techniques for Every Meat
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Barbecue enthusiasts often debate between 'low and slow' and 'hot and fast' cooking techniques. Each method has its unique strengths, suited to different types of meat. Mastering both is essential for achieving the best flavors and textures in your BBQ.

Low and Slow: Mastery Over Tough Cuts

Ideal for:

  • Brisket: Requires a long cook at low temperatures to tenderize the dense connective tissues, turning it into a succulent meal.
  • Pork Shoulder (Pulled Pork): The slow rendering of fat at low heat keeps this cut moist while it transforms into tender, flavorful pulled pork.
  • Ribs: Both pork and beef ribs benefit from the low and slow method, allowing them to absorb smoke flavor and become tender without drying out.

Pros:
  • Perfect for collagen-rich, fatty cuts.
  • Develops complex, deep smoky flavors.
  • Ensures moisture retention and tender texture.

Cons:
  • Time-intensive, requiring hours of cooking...
Choosing the Right Wood for Smoking
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The secret to a perfectly smoked piece of meat lies not just in the seasoning or the cooking technique, but significantly in the choice of wood. The type of wood used in smoking can make or break the flavor profile of your BBQ. This guide will walk you through various woods commonly used for smoking, the meats they complement best, and why hardwoods are the ideal choice.

Why Hardwoods Are the Go-To for Smoking
Hardwoods, derived from deciduous trees, are preferred for smoking due to their dense and fibrous nature. They burn slower and more consistently, providing a steady smoke that's ideal for the long process of smoking meat. Softwoods like pine are not suitable due to their high sap and resin content, which can impart a harsh and unpleasant flavor to the meat.

The Palette of Woods and Their Best Meat Pairings
  • 1. Hickory: The King of BBQ Woods
    - Flavor Profile: Robust, bacon-like flavor.
    - Best for: Pork, ribs, and brisket.
    - Why...
Mastering the Heat: The Key to Perfect BBQ Temperatures
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Achieving that mouth-watering, tender, and flavorful BBQ is a dance of precision and patience, especially when it comes to temperature control. Whether you're grilling a juicy steak or smoking a brisket, understanding how to maintain the ideal temperature is crucial. In this article, we'll dive into the essentials of managing your BBQ heat, from distinguishing good smoke from bad to avoiding the danger zones in meat cooking.

Good Smoke vs. Bad Smoke
  • Good Smoke: This is the thin, blue smoke that imparts a clean, woody flavor to your meat. It’s an indicator of a fire that's burning efficiently, with just the right amount of oxygen.
  • Bad Smoke: Thick, white or black smoke signifies incomplete combustion of wood, often resulting in a bitter taste. This type of smoke can ruin the flavor of your meat and should be avoided.

The Danger Zone: A Temperature to Avoid
  • 40°F to 140°F: This is known as the bacterial danger zone...
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